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Choose 16.0" x 22.2"

Printed On Museum Quality Premium Luster Paper.

Specs: Luster Finish,10 ml Thickness & 97 ISO Brightness

$199.00

Choose 24.0" x 33.2"

Printed On Museum Quality Premium Luster Paper.

Specs: Luster Finish,10 ml Thickness & 97 ISO Brightness

$349.00

AnteCanyon3

Choose 13.0" x 18.0"

Printed On Museum Quality Premium Luster Paper.

Specs: Luster Finish,10 ml Thickness & 97 ISO Brightness

$149.00

Global Travel Styles Fine Art Limited Edition Series

The Artist is now producing large-scale exclusive travel

fine art photography for events, offices, showrooms, retail,

institutions, homes and “Collector” Dream Rooms.

Each piece of this, 50 only, limited-edition series

has been lovingly produced by the artist as an original then

hand signed and numbered. Each Giclees is produced

on the finest museum-quality paper that lasts a lifetime.

With over 60 locations in the collection, choose

and Barry will produce a signature art piece just for you.

Antelope Canyon is the most-visited and most-photographed slot canyon in the American Southwest. It is located on Navajo land near Page, Arizona. Antelope Canyon includes two separate, photogenic slot canyon sections, referred to individually as Upper Antelope Canyon or The Crack; and Lower Antelope Canyon or The Corkscrew.

The Navajo name for Upper Antelope Canyon is Tsé bighánílíní, which means "the place where water runs through rocks." Lower Antelope Canyon is Hazdistazí or "spiral rock arches." Both are located within the LeChee Chapter of the Navajo Nation.

Antelope Canyon was formed by erosion of Navajo Sandstone, primarily due to flash flooding and secondarily due to other sub-aerial processes. Rainwater, especially during monsoon season, runs into the extensive basin above the slot canyon sections, picking up speed and sand as it rushes into the narrow passageways. Over time the passageways are eroded away, making the corridors deeper and smoothing hard edges in such a way as to form characteristic 'flowing' shapes in the rock.

Antelope Canyon is a popular location for photographers and sightseers, and a source of tourism business for the Navajo Nation. It has been accessible by permit only since 1997, when the Navajo Tribe made it a Navajo Tribal Park. Photography within the canyons is difficult due to the wide exposure range made by light reflecting off the canyon walls.

Read More: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antelope_Canyon

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