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Choose 16.0" x 22.2"

Printed On Museum Quality Premium Luster Paper.

Specs: Luster Finish,10 ml Thickness & 97 ISO Brightness

$199.00

Choose 24.0" x 33.2"

Printed On Museum Quality Premium Luster Paper.

Specs: Luster Finish,10 ml Thickness & 97 ISO Brightness

$349.00

Louvre

Choose 13.0" x 18.0"

Printed On Museum Quality Premium Luster Paper.

Specs: Luster Finish,10 ml Thickness & 97 ISO Brightness

$149.00

Global Travel Styles Fine Art Limited Edition Series

The Artist is now producing large-scale exclusive travel

fine art photography for events, offices, showrooms, retail,

institutions, homes and “Collector” Dream Rooms.

Each piece of this, 50 only, limited-edition series

has been lovingly produced by the artist as an original then

hand signed and numbered. Each Giclees is produced

on the finest museum-quality paper that lasts a lifetime.

With over 60 locations in the collection, choose

and Barry will produce a signature art piece just for you.

The Musée du Louvre, or officially Grand Louvre — in English, the Louvre Museum or simply the Louvre — is one of the world's largest museums, the most visited art museum in the world and a historic monument. A central landmark of Paris, it is located on the Right Bank of the Seine in the 1st arrondissement (district). Nearly 35,000 objects from prehistory to the 19th century are exhibited over an area of 652,300 square feet.

The museum is housed in the Louvre Palace (Palais du Louvre) which began as a fortress built in the late 12th century under Philip II. Remnants of the fortress are still visible. The building was extended many times to form the present Louvre Palace. In 1682, Louis XIV chose the Palace of Versailles for his household, leaving the Louvre primarily as a place to display the royal collection, including, from 1692, a collection of antique sculpture. In 1692, the building was occupied by the Académie des Inscriptions et Belles Lettres and the Académie Royale de Peinture et de Sculpture, which in 1699 held the first of a series of salons. The Académie remained at the Louvre for 100 years. During the French Revolution, the National Assembly decreed that the Louvre should be used as a museum, to display the nation's masterpieces.

The museum opened on 10 August 1793 with an exhibition of 537 paintings, the majority of the works being royal and confiscated church property. Because of structural problems with the building, the museum was closed in 1796 until 1801.

Read More: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musée_du_Louvre

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