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Choose 13.0" x 24.7"

Printed On Museum Quality Premium Luster Paper.

Specs: Luster Finish,10 ml Thickness & 97 ISO Brightness

$179.00

Choose 16.0" x 30.4"

Printed On Museum Quality Premium Luster Paper.

Specs: Luster Finish,10 ml Thickness & 97 ISO Brightness

$279.00

Choose 24.0" x 45.6"

Printed On Museum Quality Premium Luster Paper.

Specs: Luster Finish,10 ml Thickness & 97 ISO Brightness

$399.00

Trioumphe

Global Travel Styles Fine Art Limited Edition Series

The Artist is now producing large-scale exclusive travel

fine art photography for events, offices, showrooms, retail,

institutions, homes and “Collector” Dream Rooms.

Each piece of this, 50 only, limited-edition series

has been lovingly produced by the artist as an original then

hand signed and numbered. Each Giclees is produced

on the finest museum-quality paper that lasts a lifetime.

With over 60 locations in the collection, choose

and Barry will produce a signature art piece just for you.

The Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel is a triumphal arch in Paris, located in the Place du Carrousel on the site of the former Tuileries Palace. It was built between 1806 and 1808 to commemorate Napoleon's military victories of the previous year. The more famous Arc de Triomphe de l'Étoile nearby was designed in the same year, but it took thirty years to build, and it is about twice as massive.

The monument is 63 feet high, 75 feet wide, and 24 feet deep. The 21 feet high central arch is flanked by two smaller ones, 14 feet high. Around its exterior are eight Corinthian columns of granite, topped by eight soldiers of the Empire.

Designed by Charles Percier and Pierre François Léonard Fontaine, the arch was built between 1806 and 1808 by the Emperor Napoleon I on the model of the Arch of Constantine (312 AD) in Rome.

It was originally surmounted by the famous horses of Saint Mark's Cathedral in Venice, which had been captured in 1798 by Napoleon. In 1815, following the Battle of Waterloo and the Bourbon restoration, France ceded the quadriga to the Austrian empire which had annexed Venice under the terms of the Congress of Vienna. The Austrians immediately returned the statuary to its original place in Venice. The horses were replaced in 1828 by a quadriga sculpted by Baron François Joseph Bosio, depicting Peace riding in a triumphal chariot led by gilded Victories on both sides. The composition commemorates the Restoration of the Bourbons following Napoleon's downfall.

Read More: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arc_de_Triomphe_du_Carrousel

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